Ep. 52: You're Not Innovating If You're Not Solving Problems

***NOTE TO LISTENERS: We recorded this episode at the start of summer. Apologies for anything that feels dated.

EQ: How can the ed tech industry work with schools, teachers, and within its own ranks to create equity?

Guest: Holly Morris is an educational technology innovator whose work over the last 10 years has focused on facilitating the creation of engaging learning environments at every point on the spectrum: Pre-K to higher ed. She studied law at Berkeley and holds an MA in Education Policy from the University of Washington. 

Holly explains the meaning of ed tech - technology solutions that help schools on the back end (administrative tasks, payroll, etc.) and the front end (teacher, student, and classroom tools). She shares her experience with Global Voice - a tech platform to help all the stakeholders in the ELL system - and equity work within the tech sector, including racial and gender inclusion. Holly also drops some knowledge about how innovative educational technologies are funded, including through private grants and philanthropy (it’s expensive to fail!). She makes projections for the future of ed tech and emphasizes the importance of developing technology that serves users and their specific needs within schools. 

Champagne and Real Pain:

  • Champagne - we want to raise a glass/ pour one out for...

    • All the educators who are in the middle of their summer break. We know you won’t slow down - you’re probably at Target or at school and on Teachers Pay Teachers right, don’t lie - but it’s summer. Cheers!

    • Holly - open schools (Charter Schools Commission)

  • Real Pain - we want to call one out for

    • Summer day camps that don’t let campers go inside when it’s 90+ degrees outside. Give those kids some shade! Like actual shade!

Do Your Fudging Homework:

  • Annie: Google search “assistive tech in education” and check out some of the amazing things people are creating to make learning more accessible for people with disabilities.

  • Hope: Global Voice website

  • Holly: check out IDEO popularized Design Thinking; Arizona State University Service Blue printing

Ep. 46: Don’t be a Passive Progressive Educator

EQ: How are education association leading anti-racist work in education?

Guest: Marquita Prinzing---NBCT, elementary school teacher, mother of a 3 and almost 6 yr old. Director of SEA Center for Racial Equity

In this episode we discuss the role of teachers and unions in leading anti-racist work. We define equity literacy and the ways in which white teachers need to develop their own racial literacy instead of fumbling in their pseudo-wokeness or expecting teachers of color to carry the burden. We also wrestle with what it means to be unapologetic to our students of color.  

Resources to explore:

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Ep. 42: Equity is Not the Outcome

EQ: What does equity look like, sound like, and feel like within complex organizations?

Guest: Desiree Finch, Leadership Development, Union Organizer, and Pierce Co Manager for Fuse WA.

“As Fuse’s Pierce County Organizer, Desiree’s mission is to build leaders to resist Trump’s agenda, lead efforts to clean up our state’s upside-down tax code, and help progressives win back key local offices. Desiree will also play a leading role in implementing Fuse’s racial equity plan by enabling Fuse to become a strong ally with underrepresented communities in Pierce County."

In this episode we discuss the notion of organization and development, including industrial psychology. Desiree compares and contrasts equity work in WA state vs other states, specifically drawing on her experience in union organizing. Lastly, we chat about how to maintain hope in the Trump era.

Do Your Fudging Homework

  • Annie: This is primarily for educators, but could be really useful to anyone confronting racism in the workplace. Seattle Public Schools has a Racial Equity Analysis tool, and it serves as almost like an environmental impact statement, but for actions that may cause inequity or broaden the opportunity gap and how to avoid those outcomes. It’s not totally comprehensive, but it’s a good start.

  • Desiree: desiree@fuse.org;  go to org to do equity training---get consultancy find money and hire someone such as Archer Consulting

Ep. 19: Twice As Much To Be Considered Half As Good

EQ: How are women’s athletics treated differently than men’s athletics and why does the difference matter?

Guest: Maya Smorodinsky, English Professor at Shoreline Community College and Ultimate Frisbee aficionado.

From basic rules to the difference between "mixed" and not-mixed leagues, Maya breaks down the mysterious world of ultimate frisbee. Most importantly, we talk about the relationship between the sport and social justice including discussing the privilege of male athletes in creating space for sports like ultimate (pro leagues), unconscious bias on the field (you can’t get better if no one passes to you), and how all-women leagues develop leadership.  Furthermore, we realize that Ultimate is a metaphor for education! 

Some things to read:

Guilty-favesies:

  • Annie: frozen packaged food! Terrible for the environment, but so convenient.
  • Hope: Vampire Diaries. Irresistible TRASH.
  • Maya: consumerism. Also, television!

Do Your Fudging Homework: