Ep. 45: Not All Theater is Activist, but All is Political

EQ: How can the theater arts be a tool for racial and social justice?

Guest: Sara Freeman, UPS Theatre Department

In this episode we chat about the etymology of dramaturgy,  discuss the power of theater as a medium to both reflect and influence society, and how every choice in theater is intentional (whether the director wanted it to be or not). We discuss the challenges of funding arts programs, finding young artists where they are, and how to intentionally elevate new voices.

Freeman’s Favorite Playwrights:

Also referenced during the episode:


Guilty-Favsies:

  • Annie: the Best of Broadway on Spotify

  • Hope: bingeing short little shows on Netflix

  • Sara:Hostess cupcakes;  Belinda Carlisle

Do Your Fudging Homework:

  • Annie: the Kennedy Center has a variety of resources on arts integration under a program called Arts Edge

  • Hope: Support local theater

  • Sara: Read August Wilson’s “Century Cycle” and go support local theater by watching “Mojada”  at Tacoma Arts Live. Directed by Maria Tania Barreca, a new professor at UWT

Ep. 43: We’re in the Fire: On Teacher Diversity & Genuine Equity

EQ: What role does teacher training play in the health of our schools and the future of the teaching profession?

Guest: Tamar Krames, 2006 MIT grad, Art/ELL teacher, OSPI, currently adjunct faculty for the Master’s in Teaching at Evergreen State College

The journey to teaching is different for everyone and our amazing guest Tamar focuses on what it means to have a transnational perspectives. We discuss the relationship between literacy and language, then transition to the problem of lack of “teacher diversity.” Tamar challenges us and our listeners to expand the way we think about this and the way that all CURRENT teachers can strive to address the issue of representation (we can add books, artwork, and broaden curriculum choice). She also reminds us that teacher diversity isn’t just race, but also about language (English) supremacy (but one way to “write and think smart”) and additional intersecting oppressions that keep amazing people out of the profession. Systemically, we need to consider who is seen as an expert and make our schools places that teachers want to stay (teacher of color retention).

We transition to the role of teacher prep programs in diversifying the field, supporting culturally responsive teaching practices, and the unspoken assumptions that being a person of color means you’d be able to work cross-culturally. There are programs intentionally working to recruit and support teachers of color. Some reading:

Guilty Favesies:

  • Annie: vegan milkshakes

  • Tamar: Star Trek

  • Hope: Hi-Chews

Do Your Fudging Homework:

Ep. 42: Equity is Not the Outcome

EQ: What does equity look like, sound like, and feel like within complex organizations?

Guest: Desiree Finch, Leadership Development, Union Organizer, and Pierce Co Manager for Fuse WA.

“As Fuse’s Pierce County Organizer, Desiree’s mission is to build leaders to resist Trump’s agenda, lead efforts to clean up our state’s upside-down tax code, and help progressives win back key local offices. Desiree will also play a leading role in implementing Fuse’s racial equity plan by enabling Fuse to become a strong ally with underrepresented communities in Pierce County."

In this episode we discuss the notion of organization and development, including industrial psychology. Desiree compares and contrasts equity work in WA state vs other states, specifically drawing on her experience in union organizing. Lastly, we chat about how to maintain hope in the Trump era.

Do Your Fudging Homework

  • Annie: This is primarily for educators, but could be really useful to anyone confronting racism in the workplace. Seattle Public Schools has a Racial Equity Analysis tool, and it serves as almost like an environmental impact statement, but for actions that may cause inequity or broaden the opportunity gap and how to avoid those outcomes. It’s not totally comprehensive, but it’s a good start.

  • Desiree: desiree@fuse.org;  go to org to do equity training---get consultancy find money and hire someone such as Archer Consulting

Ep. 38: Racial Equity in AP, IB, and Honors Courses Matters

EQ: Why is educational access and access to rigorous, transformative educational experiences important?

Guest: Kim Thomas, Partnership Director for Equal Opportunity Schools and total badass. “Kimberly is deeply committed to educational access, equity and transformation and to the challenging, but critical work of ensuring that marginalized students have access to rigorous, transformative educational experiences.”

This episode takes a deep dive into equity issues in schools with the incisive, brilliant, and hilarious Kim Thomas. Topics include:

Guilty Favesies (accidental food theme):

  • Kim: all manner of delightfully junky food

  • Annie: Giant American tortillas

  • Hope: late night Taco Bell quesadillas with green sauce

Do Your Fudging Homework:

  • Kim: Scene on Radio “Seeing White” series

  • Annie: for educators - examine academic gatekeeping in your building

  • Hope: look at your own workplace and practice with the goal of being more equitable

Ep. 33: Shut Up & Listen To Youth Voices

EQ: How are youth defining and deconstructing gender in 2018 and how can adults be allies to them?


Guest: Stella Keating, 8th grader in TPS, the WA state representative for the Gender Cool Project, Instagram-lover and a youth activist. Lisa Keating, My Purple Umbrella--Episode 14

Stella tells us about how she became involved in politics and activism through My Purple Umbrella’s work on in 2016  with the Anti-Trans Bill (1552 Bathroom Bill; initiative 1515). She even testified to the school board in 4th grade! She describes her involvement in the Gender Cool Project, a program that “seeks to reach every corner of the country with positive and powerful stories about who transgender kids and their peer allies are rather than what they are. We leave the labels at the door and build understanding through storytelling about the accomplishments of these remarkable young leaders.”

She shares what it means to be a “Gender Cool Champion”, what National Coming Out Day really means (raises awareness for people who don’t have to),  the challenges of being a young activist, how she experiences sexism in the world, and how she really feels about Kavanaugh. And you MUST go read this article in Teen Vogue “Why Transgender Visibility Matters.”

Guilty Favesies

  • Annie: seeing exotic animals up close

  • Hope: Eyeglass frames

  • Stella: Instagram

  • Lisa: Facebook

Do your fudging homework

  • Annie: Educators and parents - see what support is available in your school for LGBQ+ youth and see what you can do to promote it.

  • Hope: Go back and listen to Episode 14; read book from Queerest Book Club Ever on FB

  • Stella: Queerest Book Club Ever (next book - Two Boys Kissing), read Handsome Girl and Her Beautiful Boy, read Symptoms of Being Human, shut up and listen to youth voices and educate the youth

  • Lisa: Queerest Book Club Ever. Families and allies welcome. Second Monday of the month - 7-8:30 PM. Skype with authors.  

Ep. 32: #DangerousMom’s Perspective on Childbirth, Motherhood, and Advocacy

EQ:  Why is being a stay-at-home-parent a fulltime, bad-ass job that we need in 2018?

Guest: Tobi Tommaney, Tacoma-raised, birth doula, wife, and mother.

In this episode we discuss:

  • Why Tacoma is the best place to raise a family

  • How you can be a block mom, a #dangerousmom, and a general bad-ass

  • How women’s bodies are strong and powerful---we just have to listen to ourselves.

  • The difference between pain and suffering

  • Midwifery, being a doulah, and why you should use the lotus method for your placenta

  • An insider’s perspective on the Tacoma Teacher Strike

  • Most importantly, why you are enough and just showing up to speak your truth is ENOUGH! We need to make sure our legislators and school board know they are there to serve the community!

Do Your Fudging Homework:

  • Show up at a school board meeting, email your legislator and speak up!

Ep. 31: Not Data Without Stories, Not Stories Without Data

EQ: Why is the work of the ACLU in the Washington important and relevant in 2018?

Guest: Vanessa Torres Hernandez, Youth Policy Director at American Civil Liberties Union of Washington. Nerd Farmer Guest Ep 27

The formidable and fabulous Vanessa Torres Hernandez joins us to talk about the intersection of education and the law. Vanessa shares the story of her early life in Guam, the culture shock of American college life, and her years as a teacher.

Highlights include:

  • We need to pay more attention to school safety  issues in Washington School Safety. Many instinctive responses to school shootings are wrong and not research based.  We need more preventative resources.

  • There is an absurd amount of racial bias in school suspensions and other forms of discipline

  • We need to question and re-imagine the role of law enforcement in schools

  • The importance of stories with data and data with stories in improving school safety - it can’t just be about numbers or feelings, we have to examine both

  • Equal Justice Works

  • Learn more about the Every Student Counts Alliance (ESCA), a new collaboration between organizations and individuals in Spokane working to end the overuse of suspension and expulsion in Spokane Public Schools and to eliminate disparities in rates of suspension and expulsion of students of color and students with disabilities.

  • Read more about WA state laws on suspension, including HB 1541 and Adopted Student Discipline Rules

Guilty Favesies

  • Hope: candles, especially if they’re on sale at Target

  • Annie: single-serving lunch snacks

  • Vanessa: celebrity gossip magazines


Do Your Fudging Homework:

  • Hope: What do you think about … Can the ACLU Become the NRA for the Left?

  • Vanessa: Attend Adult Civics HH; Flights and Rights (ACLU) in Seattle; issue oriented civic engagement--most important

  • Annie: clued in to what’s happening in legislature! Sign up for legislators emails

Ep. 29: Striking While Female

EQ: Is sexism even relevant to the teacher strikes or are women just being over-sensitive once again?

Guest: Megan Holyoke, 1st year teacher

Annie, Megan and Hope break down myths and sexism in the narrative about the Tacoma teacher strike.

Related links:

SPECIAL NOTE: We did a little fact finding and want to be clear about some numbers regarding leadership gender dynamics.

Ep 27: Finding Joy and Giving Love: An Interview with Musician Stephanie Johnson

stephanie-anne-johnson-featured.jpg


EQ: What’s awesome/challenging about being a women of color in the music industries?

Guest: Stephanie Anne Johnson of Tacoma (season 5 of The Voice). Born and raised in Tacoma. From a military family, Stephanie is a musician, performer and educator!

Ignore the star-struck awkwardness of the hosts during this interview with the amazing Stephanie Johnson. The way Stephanie talks about music, love, and relationships will have you reaching for your tissue box. Telling her “Tacoma Story”, Stephanie reminds listeners that each of us has a story that is uniquely our own and it is up to us to define and create these stories.

Related Links:

Guilty Favsies:

  • Hope--Expensive Vinegars
  • Annie--Swedish fish
  • Stephanie--the Kardashians

Do Your Fudging Homework:

  • Stephanie - Buy music directly from the artist; pick up a book and READ
  • Annie - Go to the Hilltop Street Fair
  • Hope - Check out Stephanie’s music on CD Baby

Ep. 26: Mommy, Look How Woke I Am: On Performative Wokeness

EQ: What does it mean to be “woke,” and how can wokeness be performative?

Guest: Amy Young, PhD, Associate Professor of Communication and Chair of the Communication and Theatre Department at Pacific Lutheran University and author of Prophets, Gurus, and Pundits: Rhetorical Styles and Public Engagement.  Guest on Nerd Farm Podcast, episode 5 “On Ignoring Calls for Civility.” Find her online: Facebook & Twitter (@Amy_Prof)

Amy brings the noise about political rhetoric and shares her insights on a variety of topics:

3631121_1280x720.jpg
  • Why she was drawn to rhetoric as a field and why it matters
  • The phenomenon of master’s theses and conference titles always including a colon
  • The fact that, when people want to talk about rhetoric (words, media, and timing), they don’t ask rhetoricians.  They ask political scientists or historians instead.
  • Donald Trump appealing only to his base using narrowly targeted rhetoric (and how some things are both authentic and unpalatable)
  • Political correctness getting a bad rap and how it actually serves to foster empathy or connection to audience.  Sometimes thinking about other people is a good idea.
  • Creepy Stephen Miller’s shark eyes and his distinctive lack of exchangeability in politics (could he work in any other administration? No).

Performing wokeness…

  • Appropriation--who gets to lay claim and perform that claim publicly--where’s the line? What’s the difference between being a fan (appreciating) and wearing a woke costume?  Using Black vernacular to construct a public identity when the target identity is marginalized or oppressed. Appropriators are afforded social capital in a way that those who constructed the culture it aren’t .
  • The tension between being clued-in and clueless.  Rachel Dolezal's calendar - 12 months of pictures of her. 

 

Greatest (and by “greatest” we mean the worst) examples…

Guilty Favesies:

  • Hope: Mangoes--manila, dried etc.  Delicious - they’re fruit, so they must be good for you.
  • Annie: cheap makeup. Crap for my skin, probably terrible for the environment. But I want a $2 e.l.f. eyeliner pencil and I won’t back down.
  • Amy: Mister, Mister

Do Your Fudging Homework:

  • Hope: Woke-check yourself.  Be reflective and authentic.
  • Annie: Go check out a list on Goodreads called “Popular Stay Woke Books.” Read all the books on the list, repeat as needed.  Notable titles include The New Jim Crow and Islamophobia and the Politics of Empire.
  • Amy: Amy’s making room in her intro classes to challenge her students by presenting rhetoric around diverse political views. Do the same in your profession (whatever it is).

Ep. 25: No Finish Line for Ending White Supremacy

EQ: What are white people doing wrong this time and how do we make it right?

Guest: Danielle Stubblefield - Seattle-based  online and anti-racist frontline protester.

Danielle brings her expertise and insights to a number of topics, including:

  • White privilege,  white entitlement, and white terrorism, including the idea of “polite” white supremacy (no matter what, white people make sure the conversation stays civil and comfortable).
  • No finish line for white supremacy--keeping it 💯, we have so much work to do
  • We're all like dirty sponges--we can clean up a mess but we're tainted
  • White supremacy is the house you need to tear down---demolition phase (take a hammer and tear sh!* up)
  • Think about IMPACT, not just intent. Own our whiteness from the beginning, stumble through life and stop trying to be well-intended but causing damage.
  • How to not be a “teacher” (aka think you know everything and are source of all knowledge). Instead we need to think of teaching and learning as hand-in-hand
  • How to leverage white privilege for good and associated risk factors (Nordstrom comes up)
  • How what is safe for white people is not safe for others.
  • The impacts of racism on quality of life and health outcomes. Watch “How Racism Leads to Health Issues”

  • How to not worry about losing face with a stranger...fight dispassionately so it becomes your routine.

  • The fact that anti-blackness is real, and thoughts about why it exists.  Jealousy? Why are white people so mad? Maybe it's because they see something they don't have! There’s a twisted sense of community that racism fills. Read Debbie Irving Waking up White to get a better understanding of racism as boxes & ladders.

  • It takes guts to challenge Oprah...especially when you're on a cruise with her!

Do Your Fudging Homework:

Ep. 23: Summer 2-for-One: Beat the Heat AND Nazis

EQ: What’s the best way to beat the summer heat while also handily dismantling racist, sexist, misogynistic hetero-patriarchal white supremacy?

We start this episode channel in our inner basic NW white lady with suggestions for how to stay literally cool thi summer. From cold brew to boozy slurpees, find ways to have a little fun and do a little self-care. Go enjoy a glacier while we still have them - i.e. go to a higher altitude and meditate on global warming.

We note that it seems that summer time not only emboldens bad outfit choices, it strengthens white supremacists. What’s up with Washington attracting white supremacists? Read more here:

Hot Tips for beating the Nazis:

  • Educate yourself about white supremacist and white nationalist language and symbology so you can identify it when you see it. Educate others.
  • Address issues in your neighborhood directly (or indirectly, if you’re concerned for your safety or the safety of others).
  • Take action online - share information on social media so that others can access it.  Look for dismissive language and know how to respond. For example, if someone says “Nazi is a misnomer.  They were a political party and they no longer exist” on Twitter, prepare a snappy comeback, like “the ideology still exists regardless of labels,” or “Delete your account.”
  • Disconnect White Power Tacoma or join Tacoma Against Nazis on Facebook
  • What’s Going on With America’s White People

Do Your Fudging Homework:

  • Annie: Go read “So You Want to Fight White Supremacy” by Ijeoma Oluo from the Establishment. Preferably while you drink a boozy slurpee on some covered patio while misting yourself with one of those spray bottle fans.
  • Hope: Educate yourself on the rise of white supremacists in the NW and take action---if you need ideas, send us a DM

Ep. 19: Twice As Much To Be Considered Half As Good

EQ: How are women’s athletics treated differently than men’s athletics and why does the difference matter?

Guest: Maya Smorodinsky, English Professor at Shoreline Community College and Ultimate Frisbee aficionado.

From basic rules to the difference between "mixed" and not-mixed leagues, Maya breaks down the mysterious world of ultimate frisbee. Most importantly, we talk about the relationship between the sport and social justice including discussing the privilege of male athletes in creating space for sports like ultimate (pro leagues), unconscious bias on the field (you can’t get better if no one passes to you), and how all-women leagues develop leadership.  Furthermore, we realize that Ultimate is a metaphor for education! 

Some things to read:

Guilty-favesies:

  • Annie: frozen packaged food! Terrible for the environment, but so convenient.
  • Hope: Vampire Diaries. Irresistible TRASH.
  • Maya: consumerism. Also, television!

Do Your Fudging Homework:

Ep. 18: Save Your Hemorrhoids Story For Facebook

EQ: How are disability justice and racial justice intertwined?

Guest: Carrie Basas, Director at WA Education Ombuds; Former Employment & Civil Rights Lawyer; Harvard Law School

Hope first met Carrie at the Seattle Times Ignite Event when she presented “Short Bus to Social Justice.” In this (delightfully) looooong conversation we discuss what it means to “pass,” what Crip Hop is and who Wheelchair Sports Camp is. Learn about Lawrence Carter Long and how the term “disabled” is being reclaimed.

Be less basic about the disabled community and and how disability rights intersect with racial equity issues by checking out the following:

We started a new segment “Guilty-Favesies”!

  • Hope: microwaveable popcorn. Covered in weird plastic and waste, but SO delicious and convenient!
  • Annie: my commute. It’s a contemplative, quiet time in the car.
  • Carrie: dysfunctional family shows and romantic comedies. See: “Love” and “Grace and Frankie” on Netflix.

Do Your Fudging Homework:

  • Hope: Go read Carrie’s article Disabilities So White and Let’s Play Ableism Bingo
  • Carrie: October Disabilities Month
  • Annie: My AP Government students just learned about the Americans with Disabilities Act, or ADA.  If you care about civil rights, which I know you do, go read up on the law and make sure you understand it. The ADA prohibits discrimination against individuals in all areas of public life, including employment, education, transit, and anywhere else open to the public.

2017 EOY Review: Bright Embers of Hope in a White-Hot Dump Fire

Our EQ: What the hell happened this year and how do we make sense of it?

From hijab wearing Barbies and the election of the first openly transgender legislator (Danica Roem) to Australia legalizing gay marriage via national referendum and Bey slayin in her maternity pictures, 2017 had many hopeful moments. We recall some of our pop culture highlights of the year.  In another segment called “Where Are They Now?” we catch up on the latest from women of the Alt Right and Roy Moore, the creep who won’t go away.  

Mentioned in the episode:

Timeless or Terrible:

dansko.jpeg
  • Danskos   

  • Dressing up your pet   

XSMALL-Superman-Dog-Cat-Puppy-Halloween-Costume-Clothes-Pet-Apparel-Superdog-Dress-Up-Pet-Supplies-by-Accessorybee-0-0.jpg

Do Your Fudging Homework: